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Purpl36irl
11-22-2012, 11:11 PM
Hi there,

Wondering if anyone could help me. I am on a project team to try and eliminate the interaction between forklifts and pedestrians across all our sites in Aus/NZ. We've been given a risk assessment tool to use from Europe which categories the frequency of pedestrian /forklift interaction as High Med Low, but does not identify how these are measured. We are looking for something like LOW = 1-2 people per hour; MED = 2-10 people per hour etc. Does anyone have any ideas for frequency likelihood categories or anything that they've used that might help. Thank you

Alcoz
11-28-2012, 05:43 PM
Hi
I would have thought the real question was are Forklifts and pedestrians interacting in an area causing it to be a "Shared Traffic Zone" in which case a lot of companys would deemed as high vis area.
Cheers!

Rodt
11-30-2012, 08:41 AM
Hello,
Sorry don't have an answer as like every other risk assessment it is subjective. I would have thought whoever sent you the tool in the first place would be the only place to get the answers. It is like asking how long is a piece of string. Especially important if you are looking to get consistency of results and benchmark. As per above terminology a "Shared Traffic Zone" in my opinion is high risk area regardless of the amount of people per hour.

Alcoz
11-30-2012, 09:00 PM
I agree and that was the point I was trying to make.

Terry
12-04-2012, 08:03 PM
Hi purpl36irl,

I am pasting a link for a desk top or laptop electronic calculator, it may help. http://www.safetyrisk.com.au/2010/03/14/electronic-risk-score-calculator-nomogram/ I would say as above a mixed area and you would need to consider defining walk areas these could be painted only or painted with barriers and crossings, a forklift driving policy, hi vis shirts and steel cap boots. If you are working with items stacked above head height you would also have to consider hard hat areas. Corner postings where the forklift may adversely impact racking, causing stock damage or fall (onto P.P.E people, property or environment).

I hope this helps

Horsburgh605
01-18-2013, 08:56 PM
Hi there,
Using Hi Vis is the last resort used for when pedestrians and forklifts, yes most companies use risk assessment to rate the level of safety, but any forklift and pedestrian integration is a hazard, just because the risk assessment rates it as a low risk, it's still a risk. When it comes to forklifts working near people the slightest of knock form a forklift can and do kill. The guy in this forum whom gave you the link to the risk assessment tool has directed you well. This tool is called a nomogram this tool is ideal for risk assessments for untrained assesses. I have compared this tool to two other risk tools and it held its ground. Note when conducting risk assessments you almost need to think a bit negative or think worst case scenario, because this will identify what can happen when things go wrong. Remember this NEVER SAY NEVER because the worst can and will happen.

Wondering if anyone could help me. I am on a project team to try and eliminate the interaction between forklifts and pedestrians across all our sites in Aus/NZ. We've been given a risk assessment tool to use from Europe which categories the frequency of pedestrian /forklift interaction as High Med Low, but does not identify how these are measured. We are looking for something like LOW = 1-2 people per hour; MED = 2-10 people per hour etc. Does anyone have any ideas for frequency likelihood categories or anything that they've used that might help. Thank you

Crackers
01-19-2013, 06:51 PM
Hi.
I work at Alcoa and we have been running with vehicle / pedestrian interaction for over a year.
It is simple if a pedestrian is in the area a vehicle is not allowed within 2 furnace from the operator which is about 20metres. If a vehicle is in the area all operators have to stay away till vehicle has left. If you want to talk to a driver you can from a metre distance while vehicle is running any closer the driver has to lower load and make fork lift secure.

alanmurfee
03-22-2013, 12:26 AM
Well, one way to segregate is by separating vehicle and pedestrian doors wherever possible. Having windows on doors will help drivers and pedestrians keep an eye on safety. Ensure to offer a good amount of clearance between the vehicles and pedestrians.

Caroline
06-05-2013, 06:48 PM
Hi all,
Conditions of entry to the area should include Hi-vis and at the very least marked walk ways. Ideally separation is the best control however this is not always achievable. Walk ways which include handrails is the better way to go. You can also look at shift times and can the material handlers be doing their job at alternate times such as before the majority of workers arrive or while the majority of the workforce is on break. You can also look at the flow of traffic and whether a one-way system might be appropriate for your situation. I agree with the first response....forks and people just don't mix. I feel your frustration!!

Good Luck!!

RobWatson
10-10-2013, 09:07 AM
Low is less than 5, Med is 6-10 and High is more than 10. I used to be an inspector in the EU. These numbers come from Mishap Probability as used in the std Risk Assessment Model. The more people walking around increases the probability for a Struck-By occurrence. I would line-off (yellow with black diagonals) all pedestrian routes and place horn signs on the rack aisle intersections as a Best Practice.

Miketrees
01-12-2015, 01:31 PM
I heard of a case where a deaf person walked near the curtains on a coolroom door.
He could not hear the horn or the reverse beeper, and was not meant to be walking there. (outside the coolroom behind the curtains)

Engineering/ separation control was about the only option that would have worked.